what to do when you’re a creative who hates business

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Thursday

June 20, 2019

There’s not a day that goes by that I don’t write. 

I rewrite blog posts, write articles for my freelancing job, practice fiction writing through exercises, and I produce content for Medium and Thought Catalog. 

It’s the first thing I do every morning at around seven-thirty. 

I’ll type on my laptop, use my Apple Pencil on the iPad, or if I’m tired of looking at a screen, I’ll write in a journal. 

Angry, sad, or in the best mood ever, I write too much, for hours on end, but I love it anyway.

What I’m saying is that I’m always willing to put in the work when it comes to writing (and editing, which I enjoy just as much).

I even like submitting and uploading my content.

But if I’m being honest, I’m not willing to put in the work when it comes to everything else. Everything else, in this case, meaning promoting my work. 

The only reason I like social media is because I get to make friends, discover people, and support other women from different places in the world.

I don’t like social media

Photo by Prateek Katyal on Unsplash

I strongly dislike posting on social media. I don’t like tweeting, pinning on Pinterest, or uploading to Instagram. 

Even if I had personal accounts, I wouldn’t post anything because I don’t care to do so. I never have.

And there’s not a deeper reason. I’m not insecure or afraid; I just don’t think it’s worth the effort.

I’m not willing to put in the work.

I should’ve posted on Instagram today, but I didn’t feel like taking a picture and coming up with a caption because I wanted to watch my Medium Mastery course. 

I was going create some pins for Pinterest, but I wanted to work on my story (and that’s what I ended up doing).

The difference between doing what I love and what I don’t

It doesn’t matter how much I love writing, I won’t always love it. You’re not always going to love what you do. 

You’ll have lazy days, days where you want to quit, and days where you feel suffocated by what you do every day. 

That’s just life. 

But I’m willing to write even if I don’t feel like it, and more often than not, after a few minutes, I’m completely lost in what I’m creating.

But it’s never like that with “everything else”.

I don’t want to work on all the social media crap. And if I don’t feel like it, I don’t do it. 

I could care less about hosting webinars and going live on Instagram—not because I don’t want to help people, but because I don’t want to put in the effort.

This is where sacrifice comes in

Photo by Jo Szczepanska on Unsplash

Unfortunately,  I don’t have a choice.

If I want to reach as many young women as I possibly can, I need to submit guest posts. 

I have to take pictures of myself. I have to be active. 

I have to get on podcasts and do interviews even though I don’t know how to speak eloquently on those things.

This is where the sacrifice part comes in, and I have to learn to take it seriously. 

I have to learn to put my feelings aside and do the work even if it’s the last thing I want to do.

Unfortunately,  I don’t have a choice.

If I want to reach as many young women as I possibly can, I need to submit guest posts. 

I have to take pictures of myself. I have to be active. 

I have to get on podcasts and do interviews even though I don’t know how to speak eloquently on those things.

This is where the sacrifice part comes in, and I have to learn to take it seriously. 

I have to learn to put my feelings aside and do the work even if it’s the last thing I want to do.

My feelings are normal (and so are yours)

If you feel this way, it’s okay. 

If you don’t feel like working on one part of your career, and you think you’re a bad human because of it, you’re not.

You’re just human. 

You can love painting, dancing, or playing your guitar and dislike the business part of it.

It’s okay if you can play until your fingers bleed, but the business side makes you want to stay in bed.

This doesn’t mean you don’t love what you do. But we have to find a way to do those things anyway because those are the steps that lead to success. 

I can keep uploading to this blog all I want, but if I don’t promote it, no one is going to find it, and I’m not going to reach my goals.

How do we push ourselves to do the business-y stuff?

Photo by Nathan DeFiesta on Unsplash

Not to sound cliché, but we have to keep our goals in mind. 

You can shoot a movie and edit it and make it the best thing ever, but if you don’t find a way to share it with the world, you’re not going to become the most famous director of our time, like you dream.

You can record an album by yourself, but if you don’t share it, you’re not going to get famous.

This is when we use those big goals, the dreams we’ve had for years, to motivate us. We can’t reach them if we don’t put ourselves out there.

I want itxayana.com to reach 100,000 young women in five years. 

I want to inspire them to create, to do what they love, and to never apologize for it. I can’t do that if no one knows who I am.

You can’t either.

But don’t worry—you and I, we’ll figure this out together. Mainly because we don’t have a choice!

Thanks for reading, and I’ll see you next week with another open journal!

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